14.5% of Florida ICU beds are open

TALLAHASSEE — As the number of COVID-19 positive tests continues to rise, some smaller hospitals have filled all of their ICU beds, but larger hospitals in neighboring counties have capacity.

Data from Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) as of July 28 show the number of ICU beds available and the number of COVID-19 positive patients current hospitalized. Data from Florida Department of Health show the number of COVID-19 positive patients who have been hospitalized to date, along with COVID-19 deaths.

• Statewide, Florida has 1,183 adult ICU beds and 273 pediatric ICU beds available — about 14.5% of the state’s ICU beds. Statewide, 24,917 COVID-19 positive residents have been hospitalized to date and 6,117 have died. The state has a total of 441,977 positives to date with a positivity rate of 12.68%.

• Collier County has 153 COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized, with 25 ICU beds open — 30.9% of ICU beds are available. Since the start of the pandemic, 621 COVID-19 positive county residents and 12 non-residents have been hospitalized; 120 have died. As of July 28, Collier had a total of 47,762 positive tests — 15.9% of total tests were positive.

• Glades County has no COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized. Glades County does not have a hospital. Since the start of the pandemic, 25 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and three have died. As of July 28, Glades County had a total of 389 positive tests — 36.3% of total tests were positive.

• Hendry County has eight COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized. Hendry County does not have ICU capacity. Since the start of the pandemic, 139 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and 34 have died. As of July 28, Hendry County had a total of 1,569 positive tests — 20.6% of total tests were positive.

• Lee County has 213 current hospitalized, 15 adult ICU beds available – 10.6 percent of adult ICU beds are currently available; 30 pediatric ICU beds are available – 35% of pediatric ICU beds are open. Since the start of the pandemic, 928 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and 279 have died. As of July 28, Lee County had a total of 14,877 positive tests — 14.2% of total tests were positive.

• Highlands County has 48 COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized with six ICU beds open — 20% of ICU beds are available. Since the start of the pandemic, 126 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and 24 have died. As of July 28, Highland County had a total of 1,103 positive tests — 7.6% of total tests.

• Martin County has 32 COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized, with 26 ICU beds open — 66.7% of ICU beds. Since the start of the pandemic, 303 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and 68 have died. As of July 28, Martin County had a total of 3,485 positive tests — 14.7% of total tests were positive.

• Okeechobee County has 14 COVID-19 positive patients currently hospitalized with no ICU beds open. Okeechobee County has a total of eight ICU beds. Since the start of the pandemic, 74 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and two have died. As of July 28, Okeechobee County had a total of 853 positive tests — 14.4% of total tests.

• Palm Beach County has 616 COVID-19 positive patients current hospitalized with 133 ICU beds open — 31.4% of ICU beds. Since the start of the pandemic, 2,489 COVID-19 positive county residents have been hospitalized and 779 have died. As of July 28, Palm Beach County had a total of 31,598 positive tests — 12.8% of total tests.

The data do not show how many of the ICU beds are occupied by COVID-19 positive patients. Some ICU beds may be in use by those with heart attacks, accident injuries or other health issues.

Help stop the spread
A new scientific study published last week in PLOS Medicine found the COVID-19 pandemic could be contained if enough members of the public would practice the measures the Florida Department of Health has recommended for months — hand washing, mask wearing and social distancing.

The conclusions of “Impact of self-imposed prevention measures and short-term government-imposed social distancing on mitigating and delaying a COVID-19 epidemic”: “We stress the importance of disease awareness in controlling the ongoing epidemic and recommend that, in addition to policies on social distancing, governments and public health institutions mobilize people to adopt self-imposed measures with proven efficacy in order to successfully tackle COVID-19.”

Wearing of face masks is encouraged because asymptomatic carriers can spread the virus without ever knowing they are contagious. The masks protect others from the wearer by catching droplets of moisture that leave the mouth and nose when the person talks, coughs, sneezes or breathes.

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.

Facebook Comment